CE Courses

COURSE TITLES (Descriptions are below)

CLINICAL TOPICS

  • Understanding & applying the new 2018 AAP classification to your practice.

  • Unlocking the mystery of dental implant classification & maintenance.

  • Diversify your Ultrasonic insert and tip portfolio.

  • Incorporating a contemporary approach to ultrasonic instrumentation.

  • Exploring air polishing technology...What does the science say?

  • Hydrogen Peroxide, it’s not just for cuts and scrapes anymore…explore its oral applications.

  • Reboot and upgrade your dental hygiene operatory with innovative technology.

  • How to practice 21st century dental hygiene.

  • It's time to talk about sex in dentistry...HPV & it's link to oral cancer.


INFECTION PREVENTION

  • How to safely practice dentistry during the Covid-19 Pandemic.

  • Dental office indoor air quality…what are we really breathing and what does the science say?

  • Understanding the EPA dental rule on amalgam waste...The four components to office compliance.


SPECIAL NEEDS POPULATION

  • Why won't he sit still....Because he can't. Treating patients with ADHD.

  • Confessions of a dental hygiene ballerina. Treating patients with eating disorders.

  • Stop the violence...Exploring domestic violence.


PHARMACOLOGY

  • The opioid pandemic and the dental professional.

  • Americans use of legal psychiatric & illicit drugs.

  • A review of the top 10 prescription drugs in the U.S.


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

CLINICAL TOPICS

  • Understanding & applying the new 2018 AAP classification to your practice.

    • This course is designed for the busy dental hygienist and will offer a practical approach to incorporating the “2018 Classification of Periodontal and Peri-Implant Diseases and Conditions” into your dental hygiene care plan. Periodontal diseases are now viewed from a multidimensional perspective with individual patient risk factors now incorporated into the robust staging and grading framework modeled after the field of oncology. The new classification system changes the ADPIE of dental hygiene care, specifically the assessment, diagnosis, treatment planning, and evaluation of gingival and periodontal diseases of natural teeth and dental implants. As the old saying goes, it’s out with the old and in with the new. If you are ready to make the time, make a change, and embrace this new methodology to patient care, then this course is for you!

  • Unlocking the mystery of dental implant classification & maintenance.

    • This course will discuss the new 2018 American Academy of Periodontology (AAP) classification system as it pertains to dental implants. The life of a dental implant varies greatly patient-to-patient. Dental providers involved in recare procedures must know how to identify an implant’s status along the continuum of health and disease. This course will review the anatomy and physiology of a dental implant, teach the provider how to identify an at-risk dental implant, and how to incorporate evidence-based technology for implant maintenance. Through increasing your knowledge in the identification of peri-implant health and disease, as laid out by the AAP, dental professionals will be able to customize treatment recommendations for their patients with a dental implant.

  • Diversify your Ultrasonic insert and tip portfolio.

    • Learn to diversify your ultrasonic magnetostrictive insert and piezoelectric tip portfolio for full mouth periodontal debridement. Dental ultrasonic technology has come a long way since its inception in 1953. Today, manufacturers offer a wide range of ultrasonic equipment to satisfy any patient presentation. When the dental hygienist has access to a variety of inserts and tips, procedures are completed more efficiently and effectively. Just as a provider uses a variety of hand instruments for non-surgical procedures, so too is needed for ultrasonic instrumentation. This course pulls back the curtain on ultrasonic technology and will teach you to diversify your insert and tip portfolio.

  • Incorporating a contemporary approach to ultrasonic instrumentation.

    • A contemporary approach to ultrasonic instrumentation meets the standards of practicing periodontal medicine as outlined in the 2018 American Academy of Periodontology and European Federation of Periodontology classification system. Periodontal medicine applies a multidimensional view of periodontal disease and considers individual patient characteristics in diagnosis and treatment recommendations. The goal of periodontal disease preventive maintenance is to detoxify root structures while conserving cementum through the removal of oral deposits to promote oral symbiosis. This current theoretical approach to periodontal disease etiology, treatment, and management is vastly different than in decades past and requires a contemporary approach to instrumentation.

This course presents current evidence-based research that shows ultrasonic instrumentation improves provider efficiency, decreases musculoskeletal strain, and conserves root structures during debridement. You will learn to incorporate a contemporary approach to ultrasonic instrumentation to reduce oral biofilm and bacterial byproducts, conserve cementum, detoxify root structures, preserve gingival integrity, and decrease inflammatory mediators while removing all levels of oral deposits to promote a state of oral symbiosis. This course will present the current market industry selection of inserts and tips that will allow you to accomplish these goals.

  • Exploring air polishing technology...What does the science say?

    • Air polishing has been a part of preventive care since the 1970s initially used for the removal of supragingival staining. Today, air polishing is predominately used for supragingival and subgingival biofilm reduction and management to aid in promoting oral symbiosis and reducing the inflammation associated with gingival and peri-implant diseases. Air polishing offers a more conservative and efficient approach for biofilm management and stain removal than alternative polishing techniques. This course will use evidence-based research to present the most current air polishing technology on the dental market for both supragingival and therapeutic subgingival application.

  • Hydrogen Peroxide, it’s not just for cuts and scrapes anymore…explore its oral applications.

    • In the United States, 47.2% of adults have periodontal disease and up to 95% have gingival disease. Periodontal disease ranks 6th among the most prevalent disorders worldwide. The presence of subgingival and supragingival biofilm in a susceptible host can cause active periodontal, gingival, and peri-implant infections. The predominating bacteria in an oral biofilm are a combination of gram positive and gram negative facultative and obligate anaerobes. Dental providers use mechanical and non-mechanical modalities to reduce biofilm levels and promote oral symbiosis. Hydrogen peroxide is an effective antimicrobial in the fight against oral disease because it is toxic to the organisms in a biofilm. This course will present the mechanism of action of hydrogen peroxide in a unique oral delivery system to aid in treatment regimens of inflammatory gingival, periodontal, and peri-implant diseases.

  • Reboot and upgrade your dental hygiene operatory with innovative technology.

    • Contemporary healthcare models for dentistry and medicine have shortened the time a provider spends with their patient but still demands high quality outcomes. Oral health care providers are expected to produce the same quality outcomes as in years past with less time allotted for patient care. This course will teach a contemporary approach to dental hygiene procedures that improves efficiency of debridement, decreases operator muscle strain and injury, and maximizes procedure time with integrated technology.

The technology boom of the 21st century has changed the healthcare landscape and revolutionized the dental field. Digital scanning in the dental operatory improves patient communication and identification of treatment needs. Debridement efficiency and root conservation are greatly improved with new power instrumentation technology such as ultrasonics, supragingival, and subgingival air polishing. Come and learn to work smarter, not harder, while integrating evidence-based dentistry in your dental hygiene operatory.

  • How to practice 21st century dental hygiene.

    • Prevalence rates of periodontal disease in the United States continue to grow as does the percentage of dentally uninsured adults as the GDP (gross domestic product) dollars spent on oral care decrease annually. This public health crisis puts added pressure on dental practitioners to treat patients in oral and systemic dysbiosis. This course will present the most current technology on the dental market, such as digital scanning, to improve time efficiency, disease management, patient communication, and treatment planning. Current research trends in biofilm management utilizing ultrasonics, air polishing, lasers, ozone, and oral hydrogen peroxide will be discussed. Come and learn to practice dentistry smarter, not harder, through incorporating 21st century technology!

  • It's time to talk about sex in dentistry...HPV & it's link to oral cancer.

    • The new millennium has brought about great advances in technology and innovation; and one of those advancements is the discovery of HPV’s link to head and neck cancer. Thirty-five years ago, it was postulated a virus called human papillomavirus could cause cervical cancer; today, it is well established that this very heterogeneous virus causes a variety of cancers. HPV is now considered a human carcinogen. Unlike other cancers of the mouth, HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancers are more likely to occur among younger patients, white men, those without the traditional risk factors of tobacco and alcohol, and those with certain sexual histories. As public awareness of HPV continues to grow, so will the knowledge base of the dental health care providers who treat them.

This course has a unique approach to discussing HPV from both a dental and medical perspective. HPV disease trends, statistics, morphology, transmission, vaccination and cancers relation will be discussed. Oral serum testing for dental professionals will be presented as well as enhanced oral cancer screenings devises.


INFECTION PREVENTION

  • How to safely practice dentistry during the Covid-19 Pandemic.

    • A comprehensive working knowledge of infection prevention practices is an essential function for all healthcare professionals. When strong workplace controls such as ongoing training with written and reviewed policies and procedures are not established, the patient and provider have an increased risk for an adverse health event. Dental health care personnel (DHCP) work in a unique and hazardous environment that differs from medical facilities.

DHCPs are exposed to radiation and contaminants such as chemicals and solutions capable of causing biological damage to a human. They are also exposed to high volumes of pathogenic organisms, blood, and saliva generated by air-driven equipment that emits an aqueous solution in the form of an aerosol and spatter. Dental aerosols become part of the centralized ventilation, travel great distances from the source of creation, and stay suspended in the air for long periods of time behaving unpredictably in the environment.

The novel SARS-CoV-2 virus is classified as an Acute Respiratory Infection by the World Health Organization. Its continued persistence in the community has revolutionized the practice of dentistry and demonstrated the importance of quality infection prevention practices including proper personal protective equipment required for aerosol-generating procedures. This course will discuss infection prevention protocols specific for the dental environment that are effective, reliable, and standardized.

  • Dental office indoor air quality…what are we really breathing and what does the science say?

    • Join us for a journey into the world of dental environmental safety. The novel SARS-CoV-2 virus and its variants that cause the disease COVID-19 continued persistence in the community has revolutionized the practice of dentistry and demonstrated the importance of quality infection prevention practices. Dental healthcare professionals are exposed to large volumes of aerosols throughout a workday which contain blood, saliva, and pathogenic organisms such as bacteria and viruses from a patient’s mouth. These aerosols can transmit diseases such as Acute Respiratory Infections (COVID-19) when viral particles are present. The aerosolized product stays suspended in the air for hours after a procedure while traveling throughout the entire dental environment when appropriate engineering controls such as high-volume evacuation, air decontamination, and quality ventilation systems are not present. The World Health Organization states the lack of ventilation, or low ventilation rates in healthcare facilities increases the risk for airborne disease outbreaks. This course uses evidence-based research to explore dental aerosols and office environment best practices.

  • Understanding the EPA dental rule on amalgam waste...The four components to office compliance.

    • The dental industry continues to be the largest source of mercury discharged to publicly owned treatment works (POTW) in the United States. In November 2017, the Environmental Protect Agency (EPA) stepped in and issued a new ruling (40 CFR Part 441) mandating specific requirements in dental amalgam waste management. Existing practices had until July 2020 to fully implement the standards of EPA Rule 40 CRF Part 441.

This course is designed to assist the busy dental practice owner with a four-step compliance plan that meets or exceeds EPA requirements. The first step is the installation of an amalgam separator that adheres to ISO 11143 and ANSI No. 108 specifications for amalgam separation efficiency. The second step is to manage vacuum lines with a cleaning product that meets best practice standards established by the American Dental Association and mandated by the EPA. The third step is proper amalgam waste management, and the fourth surrounds record keeping and documentation.


SPECIAL NEEDS POPULATION

  • Why won't he sit still....Because he can't. Treating patients with ADHD.

    • Close to 10% of children and adolescents world wide are diagnosed with ADHD each year. ADHD is a neurological disorder with three distinct classes that cannot be cured, does not go away with age, and requires continuous interventions throughout one's lifetime. While those with ADHD experience challenges with some day-to-day activities, there are also many long-term advantages to this condition. This course will define ADHD classifications and diagnostic language. The current pharmacological agents and their side effects used in the management of this neurological disorder will be presented. Through increasing your knowledge of ADHD, you will learn best practice management techniques for an effective dental appointment. Tips and tricks to increase your confidence level when treating patients of all ages who are neuro-atypical with ADHD will be provided.

  • Confessions of a dental hygiene ballerina. Treating patients with eating disorders.

    • Eating Disorders (EDs) are a growing public health problem with worldwide prevalence. The etiology of EDs is multifactorial with genetic, biological, environmental, psychological and sociocultural influences. The societal pressures for girls to be thin and boys to “bulk-up” in the United States influences our youth’s perceptions of body image. The average age of onset for EDs is puberty through adolescence and leaves the patient with long-lasting negative impacts to their health. EDs are a group of psychiatric illnesses and this course provides information based on the new diagnostic criteria from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 5th edition (DSM-5). This course will focus on the oral health care provider’s role in the identification, management, and recommendations for those with EDs.

  • Stop the violence...Exploring domestic violence.

    • One in four women and one in ten men will experience sexual violence, physical violence, and/or stalking in their lifetime. Research has shown that improved identification and response to domestic violence by healthcare professionals saves lives. Dental practitioners need to join the medical profession on the front lines of screening and intervening in the fight against this dangerous public health crisis. Domestic violence occurs across all socio-economic, educational, racial, and ethnic groups. This course will define domestic violence, discuss its long-term consequences, offer guidance for oral health care professionals to assist patients and provide tools to overcome barriers to intervention.


PHARMACOLOGY

  • The opioid pandemic and the dental professional.

    • Opioid abuse and deaths from overdose have now reached epidemic levels in the United States. These drug classes cause significant systemic changes and carry a high risk for tolerance, dependence and addiction. Dental providers who have the authority to prescribe opioids own a responsibility to the public to ensure appropriate pain management protocols are followed so patients do not run the risk of developing a debilitating addiction. This course will present commonly abused opioids and statistics, the pharmacodynamics of non-narcotic and opioids analgesics, as well as pain origin and management related to dentistry.

  • Americans use of legal psychiatric & illicit drugs.

    • According to the Centers for Disease Control, approximately 25% of the United States population suffers from mental illness. This means 1 in 4 people could present to your office who are taking a prescription medication for treatment. This course will define common mental challenges such as PTSD, anxiety, depression, bipolar, and schizophrenia, and offer best practice management techniques to effectively work with these patients. The prescriptions drug classes used in the management of mental illness and their role in treatment modalities will be discussed. Those with mental illness are at a higher risk to use and abuse alcohol and illicit drugs as a form of self-medicating and coping. A review of illicit drugs and alcohol will increase your awareness of the systemic and oral side effects so proper interventions can be treatment planned.

  • A review of the top 10 prescription drugs in the U.S.

    • This course will take you on a journey into the big dollar industry of pharmaceuticals. In 2020, Americans spent $92 billion dollars on the top 10 most profitable prescription medications on the market. Prescription drugs accounted for 10% of the United States GDP (gross domestic product) dollars spent on healthcare in 2018 which is an increase from 2013 of 9%. Every year more and more Americans are prescribed medications for a wide variety of conditions. More money is spent on prescription drug use than dental services in the U.S. In 2018, only 4% of GDP dollars spent on healthcare went to dental services while 10% went to prescription drugs.

This course will explore the top 10 most profitable, and the top 10 most prescribed medications in the United States. The conditions the drugs are used to treat will be reviewed to keep the busy oral health care provider up to date with the most common prescription medications their patients are taking.